Flowers on a Winter Day – Vogue 8633 Pattern Review

How about flowers on a “winter” day?  It’s February in Louisiana and the high for today is 83 degrees so I decided to take the opportunity to wear one of the dresses I made this month to work.  (By the way, more blog posts are to come, it’s been too cold and rainy to get things photographed).    The floral fabric you see was advertised as peachskin on Fabric.com.  It has a nice hand and is soft, however it’s not as soft as other peachskin fabrics I’ve sewn with from other places.  The bodice is lined with a royal blue crepe back satin from Hancock Fabrics.

As a pattern review, I made View E in a size 6ish.  I say “ish” because since the darts and neckline fell in the right place on my bodice muslin, I decided to add 1/2″ to the side seams of the front pieces so that the side seam could be sewn and fell in the correct place.  I didn’t go up a size, so my fit is quite exact, which is how I prefer it.

The shaping darts are interesting and a detail completely disguised by the pattern of my fabric. 🙂 I really like the shaped collar on this, however the darts were unusual.  They aren’t all your ordinary triangle shapes, and there are four of them for each of your front pieces (bodice and lining).   In conclusion, I’ll leave you with a little twirl picture 🙂 Look at that skirt get up and go!

KODAK Digital Still Camera

KODAK Digital Still Camera

Snuggly Robes for Winter – Simplicity 7417 Pattern Review

cotton-flannel-robe

Winter in Louisiana may not be as cold as other parts of the nation, but it still gets colder than I would like.  So, why not make some snuggly robes to stay warm?   I found Simplicity 7417 in my Mom’s pattern stash and appropriated it for my own use.

7417

I made View E in an XS as my muslin, and it is totally wearable.  View E has a hood, belt, patch pockets and cuffed sleeves in the shorter length. I used a black and white Cotton Flannel with music notes all over it.  I did not have enough fabric, so I made the pieces fit by shortening the sleeve and hemming it, instead of having the cuffs.  The pockets blend in on the picture (yay, pattern matching), but they are there and they are a good size.

I decided that I liked it and purchased Red Double sided Fleece to make a View F version.  View F has the same features as E.  It has  the hood, belt, and cuffed sleeves all in a full length version.

For both versions, instead of purchased bias tape, I made matching ties of the designated length from the remaining fabric pieces.  I also used organza as interfacing for the facings instead of fusible. The instructions were pretty simple.  In conclusion, I like both of them and the hoods  are deep enough for all my hair, which is a major plus. 🙂  
double-sided-fleece-robe

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Purple Suede Trench Coat – Simplicity 2311 Pattern Review

Finally, I own a trench coat.  Every girl needs one you know, why not have it in purple suede?  I know it’s been longer than a month since the last post, but I waited for the cotton flannel to go on sale for this one, so sorry so late 🙂

I’ve had the suede and lining in my stash for a couple years, so it’s about time it got put to good use.  I found it under the sale table at my local (now closed) Hancock Fabrics, marked down to $1 a yard.  I left it there for a couple weeks, and then one day I foun2311d the purple lining fabric on top of the table for about $2 a yard.  At that point I decided it was fate, something had to be made from it, and so I bought 5 yards of both.

Fast forward to November and as I was flipping through my patterns, it came to me.  It would be perfect for a variation of Simplicity 2311.  I loved the the lapels, the length, the belt and closure.

As a pattern review, this is a Project Runway design pattern, where you can mix and match elements. I made a Size 4 in the View B front, long length, regular sleeve, tie belt closure.

The instructions were easy to follow, but do include a lot of flipping back and forth between the pages if you’re making anything other than View A.  I used a purple suede with waterproof backing from my stash, cotton flannel (from Joann’s Black Friday sale) for the interlining, and a purple polyester lining (also from my stash).

As far as changes go, I made a few.  I omitted shoulder pads, interlined it in cotton flannel (for warmth, of course), added a hang loop at the interior neckline, and I had to add 2.5″ to the sleeve so that it would fit properly.  The sleeve has an ease point at the elbow. My extension was added above that so that the easing for the elbow bend sat in the correct place.  Adding it at the bottom would not have worked.  Oddly enough, even though the sleeve was too short, the pockets sat in the right place for me, as did the belt and carriers.

I would sew this again, most definitely.  I think it looks great, (if I do say so myself).  I love the look of this coat and it’s so soft and not too heavy to carry if not needed immediately.   It was hard to capture the color accurately in these pictures.  A couple pictures from in the sun are below.

Simple Tops For Fall – New Look 6108 Pattern Review

Do you ever buy fabric for a purpose, then change your mind, then go back to your original idea, and then change your mind, and then put it away and let it sit for a while?  I won’t lie, I do.  Last year, I intended to use this fabric to newlook-sportswear-pattern-6108-envelope-frontmake pants for a dance competition, but later nixed the idea and set the fabric aside in my stash for a later time.  Since I’m currently in stash busting mode, I pulled it out and put it to work.  So now I have two purple and silver shimmery tops from New Look 6108.

I picked up this pattern last year as well, but never got around to trying it out.  I made a size 4 in View A and View B.  The instructions were easy to follow but my copy had some printed mistakes.

View A: #7 says to stitch 1/4″ away from the edge and 1/4″ below the just stitched line. That didn’t make sense to me, since that would put it on the edge of the fabric, so instead I stitched  1/4″ above the first stitched line. Maybe if you’re using a zigzag stitch, that might make sense, however I straight stitched the entire shirt.


View B,C: #5 says for View C, but gives directions for twisting the shoulders of View B. It also says twist two times, but that only works if you consider 1 twist = 180 degrees. I tried it with two full 360 degree twists and it would not have looked like the pattern drawing or envelope picture.

I also found both patterns to be rather short on length, so instead of using the drafted depth of hems marked on the patterns,  I used narrow hems instead.

Either way, I like them both and will most likely make them again.  Happy Sewing! 🙂

A Velvet Jacket for Fall – McCalls 7254 Pattern Review

They tell me it’s officially Fall.  The weather here doesn’t necessarily agree, but I live down south so that’s to be expected. 🙂 So what’s Fall without a new, pretty jacket?  With the curvy lines of McCalls 7254 whisperingm7254 to me to make it, I couldn’t resist.  And in nothing less than red stretch velvet, because it’s almost red velvet season.

As a note, I purchased this velvet from FABRIC BRAVO- Better Service! on Amazon.  I ordered 2 yards and was sent 1 yard and 34 inches.  I emailed them about it and went ahead and used the fabric since I was able to squeeze my pattern pieces on it.  Lesson learned, though.

As a pattern review I made View E in an XS.  The sleeve on the pattern was short on me (I’m 5’8″) so I added 3″ to the length.  I debated on whether to interface the collar.  I eventually decided to do so, to ensure the collar would lay flat.

I like this jacket, the only thing lacking is pockets 🙂  I won’t complain though since velvet was not a recommended fabric.  It’s supposed to be for sweater knits.  The next time I make it, I may not interface the collar, depending on the material I use.  But until then I will certainly enjoy this one.

Am I Inspiration for a Michael Kors ad?

Two years ago I posted this blog post about a green fur coatToday, as I flipped through O Magazine I saw the second photo above.

White shirt, check. Blue jeans, check. Brown boots, check.  Awesome fur coat, check. Woman of color, check. 🙂 If she had big hair I would cry foul and ask why I couldn’t have just modeled for them too! lol

Maybe the stylist saw my blog, maybe great minds think alike, maybe Michael Kors wants to be me when he grows up, who knows? All I know is:

A. Imitation is the greatest form of flattery.

B. My look is in a top magazine.  Credited or uncredited, those who know me know I did it first. 🙂

C. I’m going to save this ad as a reminder to myself to keep being myself and making the garments I envision.

Have a great day! 🙂

 

From Scraps to a Shirt – McCalls 7356 Pattern Review

When  McCalls 7356 was released, I saw it and thought it would be interesting, especially in the C m7356and D views.  But I didn’t want to go buy fun and interesting fabric for it without a muslin first.  Besides, I’m also on a self-imposed “use your stash” challenge, so I decided to go through it and see what scraps I had that might be large enough to fit the bill.  Earlier this year I had to purchase two yards of red satin for the Fourth of July dress (since I went to Hancock Fabrics during their liquidation sale).  I managed to eke View A and the godets for View B (just in case) out of the remaining scraps from that dress.  I briefly contemplated using the leftover plaid from the Fourth of July dress as the contrast panels and ties as well, but decided that may be a bit much. Self editing is always a good idea! 🙂  I also used the red satin as the pockets and back pocket lining for the jeans below, but that will be for another blog post. 🙂

As a pattern review, I made a Size 8, in View A, out of Red Shantung Satin.  I omitted the piping and sleeves.   I also used the godets from View B as well, but they didn’t drape well once sewn, so I removed them.  The pattern has wide facings for the V-neck and the armholes.  I used them initially, but they were bulky and cumbersome.  This weekend I decided that the armhole facings had to go and I ripped them off ( 🙂 literally) and replaced them with 7/8 inch single fold bias binding that was leftover from a previous project.  It feels and looks better, on the hanger and on the body.  I also did not use the hem depth specified on the pattern and simply finished the edge and turned it under by 3/8 of an inch.

100_3518_Fotor

I would make it again in the future, but with several modifications.  So, I’m glad that I made a muslin first. I would lower the V neck a little more, lengthen the top to a more visually pleasing length for my height, and use bias binding again for the armholes and possibly the neckline. I would also try to add the godets and ties if I were to use a much lighter weight fabric.